9.29.22 - 10.2.22


SEPTEMBER GRAY FINE ART GALLERY PRESENTS


Kevin Cole

Ato Ribeiro
Frank Schroeder
Jamele Wright, Sr.


Opening Recetion
Thursday, September 29
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Artist Talk
Friday, September 30
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Moderated by Sugarcane Mag Editor Melissa Hunter Davis

September Gray Fine Art Gallery
764 Miami Circle NE
Suite 150
Atlanta, GA 30324

Atlanta Art Week Hours
Thursday    11 AM - 8 PM
Friday          11 AM - 8 PM
Saturday     11 AM - 8 PM
Sunday        12 PM - 5 PM
Ato Ribeiro | Untitled (Wooden Kente Quilt 5)

September Gray presents a group show for Atlanta Art Week featuring artists Frank Schroeder, Ato Ribeiro, Jamele Wright Sr., and Kevin Cole.



Opening Recetion
Thursday, September 29
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Artist Talk
Friday, September 30
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Moderated by Sugarcane Mag Editor Melissa Hunter Davis

About the Gallery


Inside the Gallery
September Gray Fine Art Gallery (SGAG) is the nation’s premier gallery specializing in contemporary works by established, mid-career and emerging African American and African diasporic artists. Located in Atlanta, Georgia, SGAG presents historically and culturally significant works as a means for championing the preservation of the African diasporic cultural legacy and narrative.

Our Offerings

SGAG denudes the intricacies of the art market by assisting corporate and private collectors with articulating and executing single acquisition and long-term collection strategies that both reflect their individual tastes and advance their short-term and long-term investment goals. In addition, SGAG offers a comprehensive range of complementary fine art, curatorial and consulting services to private and corporate clients and is conversant in the discreet assessment, acquisition and placement of fine art within its exclusive network of collectors.


About the Artists


FRANK SCHROEDER

Frank Schroeder is a classically trained French artist, whose hip-hop inspired work though rooted in classicism is a continuing dialogue with neo-expressionist graffiti artists from the late 1970s and 80s. Frank’s work is fast, responsive and instinctive, and is produced on canvas and cardboard. Given his ‘no time to lose’ mindset he favors acrylic because of its rapid drying time which is often overlaid with oil pastels and sometimes spray paint.

His pictures are rooted in conflict, in a colonial history that brought him from France to the Ivory Coast and a life of tumult and war. His escape lay in the paintings of the French masters, Géricault and Delacroix, and the poets and philosophers of 19th and 20th century. Into that potent mix came urban art, an immediate and expressive form that enabled him to tell his story, quickly, viscerally and in tune with the burgeoning hip hop scene.

“My work is focused on revisiting classical and philosophical themes that have built Western cultural and artistic Identity whatever origins or skin color, while developing a contemporary vision of these subjects. I also work on a very personal and introspective reflection from my first part of life in Africa on themes such as  “silence”, “endless waiting” and  “loneliness”.

For my part, a painting should not be a simple illustration on canvas. Each painting must tell its viewer a story (spectacle), and must become similar to “Alice in Wonderland’s” mirror, so that each person has the desire to go through it and be a part of it. My paintings take the spectator back to his own nature, fear and reality.

I work with acrylic, sticks and collage paper on large canvases. I incorporate each painting’s strong elements in large (and often black) silhouette shapes of painted kraft paper glued on the support with paint for a superior visual dimension.

I believe that painting is only interesting if it stems from an intellectual and philosophical reflection that is necessary for all creative acts. My painting is the result of a reflection that structures my thinking, my mind and my vision of the world. My artistic cultural background was shaped by Picasso, Matisse and all the great 20th Century masters of modern painting, Art Brut,  street art and black urban art. I work on a complex, emotional, modern and timeless painting.

To challenge each brush stroke … think about every brush stroke … change the world in every brush stroke, a story with one image, a story that lives and changes as it is painted.”

Ato Ribeiro

(b. 1989) is a multidisciplinary artist working in a variety of media including sculptural instillation, drawing and printmaking. He was born in Philadelphia, PA. and spent the formative years of his life in Accra, Ghana. He was the 2017 Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Emerging Artist Award recipient, Artist in Resident at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, Germany, and received Fellowships at Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, VT and Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture in Madison, ME. His work is in the permanent collections of the Mercedes-Benz USA Headquarters, Detroit Institute of Art, Cranbrook Art Museum and some private collections. He earned his B.A. from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, and his M.F.A. in Print Media from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

Kevin Cole

In Toure’s book, “Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?,” he defines the term “post-blackness” as a way for African American artists to be identified such that their work can be seen beyond the sociological/stereotypical definition of “Black Art.”  

Early in this book, he talks about the freedom that New Blacks have to be themselves without feeling as though they are tethered to a past that they do not agree with or one that they feel they are not a product of.

Truth is my work is a colorful reminder of promises still unkept, imperialism still institutionalized, and stealth deceit that has stolen the dreams and birthrights of twenty generations of a once proud people.  It stands in contrast to the canon just as Norman Lewis’ work stood in contrast to those who framed early abstract expressionism.

When I turned eighteen years old, my grandfather told me about a tree on his property where African-American men had been lynched by their neckties on their way to vote.  The experience left a profound impression. I am personally tethered to this inescapable memory.

Thus, my work is rooted in a place of targeted tragedy. Its curvilinear twists, knots, and loops are fed by the energy found in the souls of ALL those who toil and triumph everyday against the odds and against the unheralded tragedies of life.  My work is a universal story with both hero and villain, good and evil.   The narrative is embedded like html code. It is not visible to the eye, but it can be decoded…

Jamele Wright Sr.


“My work is concerned with the Black American vernacular experience. The work entails collecting found materials, Georgia red clay, and Dutch Wax cloth, by creating a conversation between family, tradition, the spiritual and material relationship between Africa and the South. My process is influenced by the way Hip Hop gathers different cultures through sampling and is charged with an energy channeled and passed through the Pan African lineage. The “In Transit” Series and my textile work is inspired by the Great Migration of Black Americans, who left the familiar in the hope of something better.”



Photos Courtsey of Courtesy Gray Fine Art Gallery